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Cripple Creek Mining Stocks (4)

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money / Stock & Bond - Mining Start Price:80.00 USD Estimated At:160.00 - 250.00 USD
Cripple Creek Mining Stocks (4)
SOLD
80.00USDto 8*************e+ (20.00) buyer's premium + applicable fees & taxes.
This item SOLD at 2018 Mar 17 @ 09:05UTC-7 : PDT/MST
SHIPPING & HANDLING: Shipping and Handling cannot be estimated prior to invoicing, based on the size and weight of your purchase. All shipping is subject to a minimum charge of $19.00. If additional shipping and handling costs are required, the buyer will be reinvoiced for the balance due. Items are not shipped until the invoice is completely paid. Many buyers purchase a number of lots. Every effort will be made to include all lots in a single shipping charge calculated to cover the weight and...
"For many years Cripple Creek's high valley, at an elevation of 9,494 feet (2,894 m), was considered no more important than a cattle pasture. Many prospectors avoided the area after the Mount Pisgah hoax, a mini gold rush caused by salting (adding gold to worthless rock). On the 20th of October, 1890, Robert Miller "Bob" Womack discovered a rich ore and the last great Colorado gold rush began. Thousands of prospectors flocked to the region, and before long Winfield Scott Stratton located the famous Independence lode, one of the largest gold strikes in history. In three years, the population increased from five hundred to ten thousand by 1893. Although $500 million worth of gold ore was dug from Cripple Creek, Womack died penniless on 10 August 1909. In 1896 Cripple Creek suffered two disastrous fires. The first occurred on April 25 destroying half of the city including much of the business district. Four days later another fire destroyed much of the remaining half. The city was rebuilt in a period of a few months, most historic buildings today date back to 1896. By 1900, Cripple Creek and its sister city, Victor, were substantial mining communities. During the 1890s, many of the miners in the Cripple Creek area joined a miners' union, the Western Federation of Miners (WFM). A significant strike took place in 1894, marking one of the few times in history that a sitting governor called out the national guard to protect miners from anti-union violence by forces under the control of the mine owners. By 1903, the allegiance of the state government had shifted and Governor James Peabody sent the Colorado National Guard into Cripple Creek with the goal of destroying union power in the gold camps. The WFM strike of 1903 and the governor's response precipitated the Colorado Labor Wars, a struggle that took many lives. Through 2005, the Cripple Creek district produced about 23.5 million troy ounces (979 1/6 troy tons; 731 metric tons) of gold. The underground mines are mostly idle, except for a few small operations. There are significant underground deposits remaining which may become feasible to mine in the future. Large scale open pit mining and cyanide heap leach extraction of near-surface ore material, left behind by the old time miners as low grade, has taken place since 1994 east of Cripple Creek, near its sister city of Victor, Colorado." from wikipedia 1) Cripple Creek and Boulder Leasing and Development issued to PJ Moran 1901 #986 500 shares, signed by president Smith, incorporated in CO. 2) Carnation Gold Mining and Milling issued to Mary Neff 1902 #1289 100 shares, signed by president, incorporated in CO 3) Cresson Consolidated Gold Mining and Milling issued to Gertrude Zell 1916, #390 500 shares signed by president.4) Colorado Consolidated Mines issued to Moses Rice 1906 #1111 250 shares, signed by president Rickey (Al Adams Gold Rush Memorabilia Collection) Date: Location: Cripple Creek, Colorado HWAC# 58901