1025

Significant Historical Letter Hinting at the Possibility of a Mint in Georgia

Currency:USD Category:Coins & Paper Money Start Price:2,500.00 USD Estimated At:5,000.00 - 10,000.00 USD
Significant Historical Letter Hinting at the Possibility of a Mint in Georgia
SOLD
7,750.00USDto e********v+ (1,937.50) buyer's premium + applicable fees & taxes.
This item SOLD at 2018 Mar 15 @ 08:36UTC-7 : PDT/MST
SHIPPING & HANDLING: Shipping and Handling cannot be estimated prior to invoicing, based on the size and weight of your purchase. All shipping is subject to a minimum charge of $19.00. If additional shipping and handling costs are required, the buyer will be reinvoiced for the balance due. Items are not shipped until the invoice is completely paid. Many buyers purchase a number of lots. Every effort will be made to include all lots in a single shipping charge calculated to cover the weight and...
Incredible two page letter written and signed by the president of the Central Bank of Georgia, James Camak, addressed to Samuel Moore, Director of the Mint in Philadelphia, datelined Milledgeville, (Georgia) March 13, 1830. This early letter was written in less than a year from the original date of discoveries of gold in Georgia. “Within the past year, discoveries have been made in this state which warrant the conclusion that the gold mines of Georgia are very valuable. It has been suggested that those who own, or are engaged in working these mines, would be greatly accommodated, could some arrangement be made by which they could dispose of the gold they may find, to this bank. And it is believed that probably the bank itself may be benefited by such arrangement. Will you have the goodness to furnish the Directors with the information that may enable them to decide on the subject. In particular, it would be desirable to us to know what your regulations are in connection with the gold you receive from N Carolina, and the most approved methods practiced at the Mint to avoid imposition…”

Hixon (US Obsolete Bank Notes, 1988) shows this bank as existing from 1829-1842. As a new bank, they would have been anxious to try to get a piece of the Georgia gold business. Bank notes from this bank are extremely rare. Their involvement in the Georgia gold business is unknown, but it appears that they never directly entered the Georgia gold market, as evidenced by the fact that they never placed a branch in Auraria or Dahlonega. The Bank of Darien (1818-1841) also had a branch in Milledgeville. They were successful in opening branches in Auraria (c1834-1836) and Dahlonega (c1836-1841), and probably had the majority of the gold region banking business during the first decade of the Dahlonega Branch Mint.

Milledgeville was the historical state capital of Georgia. It became the state capital in 1804, and remained the capital through the Civil War, when General Sherman invaded and overtook the town. In 1868 the capital was moved to Atlanta. None of the principals on this certificate are listed in Bonner’s Milledgeville, Georgia’s Antebellum Capital, 1978.

The first step in attracting a United States Mint to Georgia would be to prove there is enough gold and the necessity of doing so. This letter dated March 13, 1830 is from James Camak of the Central Bank of Georgia. The bottom of the second page says "Samuel Moore, esq. / Philadelphia." He was appointed by President James Monroe as Director of the United States Mint on July 15, 1824, holding this office until 1835. Moore moved to Philadelphia. This letter is going to Samuel Moore of the United States Mint in Philadelphia. The letter promotes Georgia mining, "...the conclusion that the gold mines of Georgia are very valuable." The letter than suggests a place to assay this gold, "It has been suggested that those who own or are engaged in working these mines, would be greatly accommodated could some arrangement be made by which they could dispose of the gold...." Finally, Mr. Camak promotes his bank as the proper place for this, "This bank is a state institution....No purpose of speculation, therefore, can be entertained...." Five years later Dahlonega would receive a branch mint of the United States Mint. A few tears. Two rips at edges of folds. One old tape mark. (Al Adams Gold Rush Memorabilia Collection) Date: 1830 Location: Milledgeville, Georgia HWAC# 57066